Do Chia Seeds Go Bad? – How To Store Chia Seeds

Do Chia Seeds Go Bad? – How To Store Chia Seeds



If you’re reading this article you may already have heard about the great health benefits of chia seeds, but you may be wondering about the practicalities of them.  Read on to find out the answers to four, key questions about chia seeds.

How long do chia seeds last?

Do chia seeds expire?

Do chia seeds go bad?

How to store chia seeds?

<–See Our Post – Best Chia Seeds Review – Where To Buy–>

How long do chia seeds last?

This is actually a more interesting question than it may initially sound.  Most manufacturers set the expiry date at around two years after processing.  Unless you really mistreat your seeds, you can reasonably expect them to last at least that long.  If you are good to your seeds, they can last up to two years beyond the official expiry date.

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Do chia seeds expire?

By “do chia seeds expire” we mean do chia seeds lose their goodness?  The short answer to this is yes, ultimately all foods will lose their goodness through age.  Chia seeds, like many foods, may lose their goodness earlier than you would expect if they are badly stored.  Expired chia seeds will taste perfectly fine and be safe to eat, they just won’t do you as much good, although even then you’ll still benefit from the fiber and their ability to store water.

how to store chia seeds

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Do chia seeds go bad?

By “do chia seeds go bad” we mean do chia seeds become unsafe or at least unpleasant to eat.  Again, the short answer is yes and this is all the more likely if the chia steeds are badly stored, so we’ll discuss this later.  Fortunately there are some easy ways to tell if your chia seeds have gone bad and it can be worthwhile checking this periodically, particularly if you are using them after their official expiry date.

Rancid smell

Chia seeds generally only have a very faint smell, even when they go bad.  Therefore we would suggest that you periodically grind some of them with a pestle and mortar to release the scent.  If there is a rancid smell then your chia seeds have, sadly, gone bad.

Bitter taste

Similar comments apply here.  Generally speaking chia seeds have little to no identifiable taste, other than, perhaps, a slight nuttiness if you eat them as a snack.  If you taste anything in the way of bitterness then it is a strong sign your chia seeds have gone bad.

Unusual appearance

This relates more to your chia seeds being spoiled than your chia seeds going bad, but the end effect is the same, you will need to stop eating them.  Storing your chia seeds properly means keeping them protected from damage, for example by water or mice.  If the appearance of your chia seeds changes or you see that something has become mixed in with them, then it’s probably best to stop eating them.

how to store chia seeds

<–See Our Post – Best Chia Seeds Review – Where To Buy–>

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How to store chia seeds?

Before we go on to explain how to store chia seeds, we’d like to emphasize the importance of buying chia seeds from a reputable supplier.  Basically you can only control how your chia seeds are stored once you get them home.  Before that, you need to rely on your supplier and the fact is that both internet retailers and their bricks and mortar counterparts vary widely in how well they store their merchandise prior to its sale.

Point number one is to use a suitable container.  Many suppliers sell chia seeds in a resealable bag.  This can be convenient but we’d still recommend putting the bag into a stronger container or just putting the seeds into another container and recycling the bag.  Per our previous comments, the container should be strong enough to keep out air, water, pests and food odors.  These last may not make your chia seeds go bad, but they may add a nasty taste.

You may actually find it best to divide your chia seeds between two containers.  One container will hold your current supply and the other will keep the rest of your seeds for later use.  Even though chia seeds are affordable, we’d strongly recommend making sure the containers are clearly labelled so people don’t either misuse them (e.g. eat too many) or accidentally throw them away and, of course, containers need to shut tightly to prevent accidental spilling.

Although the fridge may seem the obvious first choice of place to keep your current supply of chia seeds and, indeed, is recommended by several brands of chia seeds, it is not necessarily the best place to store your chia seeds.

On the plus side, the cool temperature of the fridge is, obviously, good for your seeds.  On the minus side, the average fridge has its door opened regularly, meaning that the temperature will change frequently and also the fridge light will go off and on regularly too.  In addition to this, if you use your fridge to store foods with strong flavors, such as onions and pineapple, then the odor may contaminate your chia seeds.  Given all this, if you do opt for the fridge, you may want to stick to very small quantities of chia seeds.

Your other option is just to use a cupboard, preferably a cool, dark one, the sort of place you’d use to store root vegetables.  Pantries can also be a good choice, particularly if you can use a dark container, we’d just like to remind you of our earlier point regarding the importance of labelling.  You really don’t want someone treating your chia seeds, like, say poppy seeds.

The rest of your supply of chia seeds can go into the freezer to preserve their freshness and goodness for as long as possible.  If you’re going to do this, then you may wish to upgrade the bag in which they came to a proper Ziploc bag and then ideally put this inside a stronger container.

We’re suggesting this approach because the air inside a freezer is, literally, freezing and if it gets into your chia seeds, it may damage them, hence the Ziploc bag.  The extra container is basically for added protection both from the effects of cold air and the possibility of physical damage.  We’re guessing you probably want to avoid having to clean out spilled chia seeds from the inside of your freezer.

<–See Our Post – Best Chia Seeds Review – Where To Buy–>

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